For Immediate Release: Press Release

November 20, 2015

 

Contact: Steven Romeo, The Change Project, 205.356.3998, steven@embodyprogress.org

The Change Project to be honored at The White House on Monday

Founder, and Birmingham-based non-profit named as Champion of Change by The White House

Birmingham, AL - Steven Romeo, Artist and Director of The Change Project, will be honored on Monday, November 23, 2015 in a White House ceremony for their work as a Champion of Change, an award for artists who are promoting LGBTQ inclusivity and understanding in the United States.

According to the White House’s website, as the LGBTQ movement in America continues to make monumental strides towards equality, individuals and communities across the country are taking steps to protect LGBTQ Americans who still face discrimination. Artists across the country have a unique opportunity to draw attention to issues facing the LGBTQ community, tell authentic stories, and positively shape the conversation around issues in the LGBTQ and allied community. Upon hearing that they would be honored today, Romeo stated “I feel humbled and proud to be an amplifying voices of queer people in rural spaces. I am hopeful for future endeavors.”

In 2012, when Romeo was conceptualizing what the project's artwork should look like, they were drawn to the idea that queer people should be called what they want to be called. The result was an art campaign called Our Bodies. Our Lives, an exploration into the way LGBTQ people see themselves and how others see them. Our Bodies. Our Lives asks the viewer to challenge what they think an LGBTQ person should or should not look like.

The project creates dialogue around art. The artwork brings greater visibility to the experiences of all LGBTQ by using portraits of people to highlight the intersectionality inherent in human identity and demonstrating how understanding this intersectionality is important to achieving social equality. “By supporting LGBTQ people through highly-visible campaigns, we counteract stigma and prejudice against LGBTQ people. By sharing the stories of individuals of diverse backgrounds, we seek to destabilize the societal obstacles for LGBTQ people of multiple, concomitant identities” says Romeo.

Since 2012, The Change Project has sought to to transform discrimination against marginalized groups into acceptance for all people through the art of photography, social media campaigns, educational resources, and partnerships with anti-bullying organizations.

 

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